Clinical Trials

One of the primary goals of AURIC is to move new therapies from the laboratory to the clinic. To do this, the Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine has ongoing clinical trials. These trials help doctors investigate new treatments and methods of detection to provide better care for people and animals with cancer. 

If you think your pet may be eligible to participate in one of Auburn’s clinical trials, contact the faculty member conducting the trial or AURIC directly.

College of Veterinary Medicine - Current Trials

Canine Osteosarcoma
Bruce F. Smith, V.M.D., Ph.D.

Purpose
Determine the efficacy of a conditionally replicative adenovirus (CRAd) in dogs with long bone osteosarcoma.

Canine Mammary Cancer
R. Curtis Bird, Ph.D.

Purpose
Evaluate the effectiveness of a revolutionary new cell-based vaccine technology designed to enhance the patient’s own immune recognition and response to mammary/breast cancer (mammary adenocarcinoma).

Canine Nasal Carcinoma
Annette N. Smith, D.V.M.

Purpose
Examine the efficacy of toceranib phosphate (Palladia) as a primary and/or adjuvant agent in the treatment of canine nasal carcinoma

Feline Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Annette N. Smith, D.V.M.

Purpose
Examine the efficacy of toceranib phosphate (Palladia) as a primary and/or adjuvant agent in the treatment of feline oral squamous cell carcinoma

Canine Soft Tissue Sarcomas
Amy Back, D.V.M.

Purpose
Evaluate the effects of metronomic chlorambucil chemotherapy on regulatory T cells in dogs with soft tissue sarcomas. Chlorambucil is commonly employed in metronomic chemotherapy protocols, but the effects on regulatory T cells are unknown.

For a listing of veterinary clinical trials, visit the clinical trials webpage.
Clinical trials at Auburn University are overseen by appropriate regulatory committees including the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee, the Clinical Research Review Committee (animal trials) and the Institution Review Board (human trials).